Is God an author?

Who really wrote the sacred texts?

Joshua Hehe

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I don’t doubt that God inspired many if not all of the sacred texts in the world. I just think that the Vedas, Tao Te Ching, Bible, Qur’an, and all the other great works were written by people, not the Supreme Being. Think of it like this, if Allah spoke to the archangel Gabriel who then spoke to the prophet Muhammad who then told his companions which eventually wrote it down, then the Qur’an is not the direct word of God. The point is that the Supreme Being didn’t write it, or any other book for that matter. Along with this, contrary to the standard narrative in Judaism and Christianity, Moses did not write the Old Testament in the 13th century BCE. After all, his death and funeral are described in Deuteronomy, so there’s no way he could have written about that because he was dead. The Torah is really the result of numerous amalgamations and revisions of both oral and written accounts from various different sources over time. This is all based on a mix of historical and mythological events, tracing back to a real exodus in which the Israelites encountered the Midianites. They lived in the desert of southern Canaan and worshiped God in the form of a deity named YHW (pronounced yah-hoo). Thus, in the year 1275 BCE, Moses began to call God YHWH (pronounced yah-way), and with the recognition of Yahweh as the Supreme Being, Judaism was born.

Now, given that there were dozens of authors who contributed to the Bible, it’s much easier for me to just focus on the development of the Old Testament, specifically the “Pentateuch”, in order to properly explain what I’m talking about. As far as I can tell there were at least four authors and one editor who created Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Here’s what really happened. In the middle of the 10th century BCE, after the rise of Israel, a noblewoman in Judah wrote down the best-known versions of the “Creation”, “Flood”, “Covenant”, and “Sodom and Gomorrah” stories. Then, she presented this to the king and his royal court at Solomon’s Temple, known as the “House of Yahweh”. As part of the first draft of the Torah, in a clever political move, she spoke very favorably of the royal family. Then, in the 8th century BCE, not long before the fall of Israel, an ancient Israelite priest wrote about God as Elohim rather than Yahweh. The thing was that he…

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